Feb 11, 2008

Biharis:: Victims of Politics

I completely agree with Raj Thackeray. We must respect local culture. Immigrants cannot impose their culture over the local practices.

All the latest arguments have been directed towards 'Biharis'. Its very common to find people saying that they hate Biharis or that Biharis have ruined their city etc. But we have to think about it.They are not here out of their choice. they have been forced to move out of their state and seek refuge in other states. If they had good jobs and infrastructure in their home state, why would anyone want to settle down in anyother state??


Then again it all boils down to politics and corruption.



Ask any Bihari.. He would love to go back to his home town anyday. but without the fear of being kidnapped and married off etc.



As for the issue of respecting local culture, i guess its one of drawbacks of metropolitan culture. Cities like Bangalore, Pune, Mumbai etc cannot claim to be singular societies anymore.



however, being 'outsiders' we must not over do things in the name of culture. In Delhi, the ITO bridge which can be called as Delhi's Brooklyn bridge is blocked for 2-3 days during the chhath pooja. And as most of the labourers are from Bihar, they literally hold the city hostage.


Its like the story of the Camel and the Arab. It goes like this:
An Arab was going across the desert on his camel. At night, he setup his tent and went to bed. It got very cold and chilly at night and the camel couldn't sleep for he was sleeping outside. He woke up the Arab and pleaded and begged the Arab to allow him inside. As there was no space, the camel agreed to put only his head inside the tent. After sometime, the Camel asked the Arab if he could put only his right front leg. Then his left front leg. Then he didn't bother to ask and put his hind legs also inside. Thus within no time the Arab was out of the tent and the camel was sleeping cosily inside!!



We must not exploit others hospitality or consider it as their weakness.



Unfortunately, the weak are as usual the victims here. All this is again politically driven. The Biharis have been reduced to mere pawns in a political game. They will have to fight for their state rather than fight for their rights in other states.


We in general.. the public, disregard and disrespect Biharis. It's because we associate them with their home state Bihar. All the things its infamous for. They, the Biharis will have to realise that until their home state is made respectable, it will be hard for them to earn respect elsewhere.


Not that they are unwelcome, we think that they will bring anarchy (like the one prevalent in their state) with them and ruin ours as well.


There is no clear argument or solution to their problem. except that the biharis have to raise their voice against being exploited by their own people.

12 comments:

  1. Yippee First comment!!!

    I think i can prescribe your blog to those who are preparing for group discussions and interviews. It contains information the fun way. And that thing about biharis every word true.... Nice analogy with the arab camel story !!!

    Cheers !!! I cant find a reason you cant be an IAS officer

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  2. @ zahid
    THANKS a lotttttttt :)
    bt a lil correction thr.. m aiming fr the IFS n nt the IAS.. :P

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  3. Very interesting post .. I agree with politics and corruption being responsible for many of the issues .. but I also feel its our shallow human nature that causes segregation between people of different regions.

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  4. After reading about IFS one day in paper even i thought i would be one...But then someother things caught me....

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  5. @ cosmic joy
    very true!! descrimination also contributes. but i guess there is also a bigger motive and cause behind the discrimination.

    @ Zahid
    u still have a shot at it.

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  6. I hate politics...in this short life we live, I'd love to avoid stupid selfish politicians and their dramas.


    ty for stopping by my blog :)

    Happy Vals Day!

    Keshi.

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  7. Du think thers the concept of outsiders anymore?? When does one even start belonging then>

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  8. @ Keshi
    thts the common sentiment but its an unavoidable part of our life..we must not ignore it.. n thnks same to u :)


    @ Hakuna Matata
    i guess u start belonging when u merge into the society and not create a menace.

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  9. nice clear reciprocated views!
    liked reading that...

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  10. Nice blog.. serious matters dealt lightly :)

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  11. completely agree with what u said there. though i must say that u cant equate the bihari with the camel. states are just a geographical demarkation, india is one and no other indian should be considered an outsider in another state

    chris

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